Make YOUR voice heard in our Exhibit Renovation!

Attention all Richmond History Lovers!

You may have heard we’re working to renovate the Native American Gallery in our permanent exhibit. We’re so honored to be working with a team of Native American Advisors that are guiding the renovation process.

After working with the advisory council and exhibit designers at Scientific Art Studio, we developed a detailed set of plans. You can take a look at the overview below or in hard copy at the Museum.

We envision murals of the natural landscape,that immerses the visitor in the natural world prior to industrial development. There are several interactive stations planned that teach about the Chochenyo language, basket weaving and the Native diet. Artifacts recovered from the shellmound on Brooks Island will illustrate how the Ohlone used natural materials to make tools and body ornaments. Columns will show stratigraphy of the archaeological excavations in the local shellmounds and modern Native voices will

Do you want to learn more about the exhibit renovation process? Do you have comments or ideas you want to share with us about the plans? We’re hosting a free day and community advisory meeting on August 18, 2018 to discuss the plans and learn more about what you think! Can’t join us on August 18th but still want to participate? Feel free to email us at info@richmondmuseum.org.

Thank you for your continued support! We couldn’t do it without you.

The exhibit renovation project is supported by the Coles Family, the Lesher Foundation, the Christensen Fund, Mechanics Bank and California Humanities.

How World War I Changed Richmond – Free Community Reception March 11, 2pm

World War I Exhibit – How World War I Changed Richmond

DATES:  March 11? June 30, 2017

Richmond Museum of History
400 Nevin Avenue, Richmond, CA 94802
Open: 1?4pm Wednesday through Sunday
Fees: Adults is $5 or Seniors/Students $3, Children are FREE!

Public Programs:
Karen English, April 8, 2pm, Poetry of World War I
Susan Anderson, June 3, 2pm, World War I,
Resistance and the New Negro in California

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